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Early Maglemosian culture in the Preboreal landscape: Archaeology and vegetation from the earliest Mesolithic site in Denmark at Lundby Mose, Sjaelland.(Report)

Quaternary International, August 18, 2015, Vol.378, p.73(15) [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Early Maglemosian culture in the Preboreal landscape: Archaeology and vegetation from the earliest Mesolithic site in Denmark at Lundby Mose, Sjaelland.(Report)
  • Assuntos: Archaeology
  • É parte de: Quaternary International, August 18, 2015, Vol.378, p.73(15)
  • Descrição: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2014.03.056 Byline: Catherine A. Jessen, Kristoffer Buck Pedersen, Charlie Christensen, Jesper Olsen, Morten Fischer Mortensen, Keld Moller Hansen Abstract: The transition from Late Palaeolithic to early Mesolithic cultures is strongly associated with the major environmental and climatic changes occurring with the shift from the Younger Dryas to the Holocene in northern Europe. In this paper, we present an interdisciplinary study combining archaeological and palaeoenvironmental research in an attempt to examine the relationship between environment and culture during this transition. Lundby Mose is a former kettle hole lake in southern Denmark where the earliest Danish human traces of the Holocene were excavated. Two types of bone deposits were found, 1) ritual offerings of worked, marrow-split elk bones and antler and 2) settlement waste with multiple species. These date to the early Holocene and are affiliated to the early Maglemose culture. The modelled.sup.14C ages suggest that the bones were deposited in four phases. A pollen based palaeoenvironmental reconstruction suggests that the ritual offerings were deposited in an environment of limited, underdeveloped forest with unstable soils and areas of open grassland. The settlement waste deposit is associated with a more developed Preboreal forest type. This forest type was not fully established until c. 11,250 cal BP and if substantiated by further evidence, may be one of the reasons why there are no known early Maglemose/Preboreal settlement sites in southern Scandinavia. Author Affiliation: (a) The National Museum of Denmark, Environmental Archaeology & Materials Science, Ny Vestergade 11, 1471 Copenhagen K, Denmark (b) Museum Southeast Denmark, Slotsruinen 1, 4760 Vordingborg, Denmark (c) AMS.sup.14C Dating Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • Idioma: Inglês

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