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Trypanosoma livingstonei: a new species from African bats supports the bat seeding hypothesis for the Trypanosoma cruzi clade

Lima, Luciana; Álvarez, Oneida Espinosa; Hamilton, Patrick B.; Neves, Luis; Takata, Carmen Silvia De Almeida; Campaner, Marta; Attias, Márcia; Souza, Wanderley De; Camargo, Erney Felicio Plessmann De; Teixeira, Marta Maria Geraldes Universidade De São Paulo

Parasites and Vectors, London, v.6, n.1, 2013

BioMed Central; London 2013

Acesso online

  • Título:
    Trypanosoma livingstonei: a new species from African bats supports the bat seeding hypothesis for the Trypanosoma cruzi clade
  • Autor: Lima, Luciana; Álvarez, Oneida Espinosa; Hamilton, Patrick B.; Neves, Luis; Takata, Carmen Silvia De Almeida; Campaner, Marta; Attias, Márcia; Souza, Wanderley De; Camargo, Erney Felicio Plessmann De; Teixeira, Marta Maria Geraldes
  • Universidade De São Paulo
  • Assuntos: Chiroptera; Taxonomy; Phylogeny; Phylogeography; Evolution; Africa; Trypanosoma Cruzi; Chiroptera; Taxonomia Animal; Filogenia; Evolução; Trypanosoma Cruzi; Morcegos
  • É parte de: Parasites and Vectors, London, v.6, n.1, 2013
  • Descrição: BACKGROUND: Bat trypanosomes have been implicated in the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade, which comprises species from a wide geographic and host range in South America, Africa and Europe, including bat-restricted species and the generalist agents of human American trypanosomosis T. cruzi and T. rangeli. METHODS: Trypanosomes from bats (Rhinolophus landeri and Hipposideros caffer) captured in Mozambique, southeast Africa, were isolated by hemoculture. Barcoding was carried out through the V7V8 region of Small Subunit (SSU) rRNA and Fluorescent Fragment Length barcoding (FFLB). Phylogenetic inferences were based on SSU rRNA, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) and Spliced Leader (SL) genes. Morphological characterization included light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: New trypanosomes from bats clustered together forming a clade basal to a larger assemblage called the T. cruzi clade. Barcoding, phylogenetic analyses and genetic distances based on SSU rRNA and gGAPDH supported these trypanosomes as a new species, which we named Trypanosoma livingstonei n. sp. The large and highly polymorphic SL gene repeats of this species showed a copy of the 5S ribosomal RNA into the intergenic region. Unique morphological (large and broad blood trypomastigotes compatible to species of the subgenus Megatrypanum and cultures showing highly pleomorphic epimastigotes and long and slender trypomastigotes) and ultrastructural (cytostome and reservosomes) features and growth behaviour (when co-cultivated with HeLa cells at 37°C differentiated into trypomastigotes resembling the blood forms and do not invaded the cells) complemented the description of this species. CONCLUSION: Phylogenetic inferences supported the hypothesis that Trypanosoma livingstonei n. sp. diverged from a common ancestral bat trypanosome that evolved exclusively in Chiroptera or switched at independent opportunities to mammals of several orders forming the clade T. cruzi, hence, providing further support for the bat seeding hypothesis to explain the origin of T. cruzi and T. rangeli.
    São Paulo State Research Support Foundation (FAPESP, 2012/14985-6)
  • DOI: 10.1186/1756-3305-6-221
  • Títulos relacionados: Parasites and Vectors
  • Editor: BioMed Central; London
  • Data de publicação: 2013
  • Idioma: Inglês

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