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Making a stand: five centuries of population growth in colonizing populations of Pinus ponderosa

Lesser, Mark R. ; Jackson, Stephen T.

Ecology, May 2012, Vol.93(5), pp.1071-1081 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Making a stand: five centuries of population growth in colonizing populations of Pinus ponderosa
  • Autor: Lesser, Mark R. ; Jackson, Stephen T.
  • Assuntos: Allee Effects ; Bighorn Basin ; Wyoming ; Usa ; Climate Variability ; Colonization ; Demographic Stochasticity ; Demography ; Growth Rate ; Invasion ; Pinus Ponderosa
  • É parte de: Ecology, May 2012, Vol.93(5), pp.1071-1081
  • Descrição: The processes underlying the development of new populations are important for understanding how species colonize new territory and form viable long‐term populations. Life‐history‐mediated processes such as Allee effects and dispersal capability may interact with climate variability and site‐specific factors to govern population success and failure over extended time frames. We studied four disjunct populations of ponderosa pine in the Bighorn Basin of north‐central Wyoming to examine population growth spanning more than five centuries. The study populations are separated from continuous ponderosa pine forest by distances ranging from 15 to >100 km. Strong evidence indicates that the initial colonizing individuals are still present, yielding a nearly complete record of population history. All trees in each population were aged using dendroecological techniques. The populations were all founded between 1530 and 1655 cal yr CE. All show logistic growth patterns, with initial exponential growth followed by a slowing during the mid to late 20th century. Initial population growth was slower than expectations from a logistic regression model at all four populations, but increased during the mid‐18th century. Initial lags in population growth may have been due to strong Allee effects. A combination of overcoming Allee effects and a transition to favorable climate conditions may have facilitated a mid‐18th century pulse in population growth rate.

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