skip to main content

SPATIAL POPULATION STRUCTURE IN THE WHIRLIGIG BEETLE DINEUTUS ASSIMILIS: EVOLUTIONARY INFERENCES BASED ON MITOCHONDRIAL DNA AND FIELD DATA

Nürnberger, Beate ; Harrison, Richard G.

Evolution, April 1995, Vol.49(2), pp.266-275 [Periódico revisado por pares]

Texto completo disponível

Ver todas as versões
Citações Citado por
  • Título:
    SPATIAL POPULATION STRUCTURE IN THE WHIRLIGIG BEETLE DINEUTUS ASSIMILIS: EVOLUTIONARY INFERENCES BASED ON MITOCHONDRIAL DNA AND FIELD DATA
  • Autor: Nürnberger, Beate ; Harrison, Richard G.
  • Assuntos: Dineutus Assimilis ; Dispersal ; F St ; Gene Flow ; Gyrinidae ; Mtdna ; Population Structure
  • É parte de: Evolution, April 1995, Vol.49(2), pp.266-275
  • Descrição: The spatial population structure of the pond‐living water beetle (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae) was investigated through a field study of population dynamics and dispersal, with a concurrent assessment of the spatial distribution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction‐fragment‐length polymorphism (RFLP). A comprehensive 2‐yr survey within a 60‐km study area revealed pronounced fluctuations in local abundances, including extinctions and colonizations. The recapture of marked individuals showed that dispersal among ponds is frequent in both males and females and connects populations on a large geographic scale (maximum observed flight distance: 20 km). The population structure of is thus characterized by both pronounced genetic drift and frequent gene flow. Together, these two forces generate a pattern of very local and transient genetic differentiation. Mitochondrial DNA samples collected within a few kilometers indicate highly significant spatial structure, if newly founded demes or those that experienced recent bottlenecks are included. These results based on four demes within the study area were placed into a regional context by further samples collected at distances of 100 km and 200 km. estimates computed on increasing spatial scales were variable but showed no increasing trend. Thus, gene flow exerts a strong homogenizing force over a wide geographic range but is counteracted locally by genetic drift. These findings highlight the need to supplement estimates of with additional data to arrive at valid interpretations of the genetic information. More generally, this study raises questions about how to capture the relevant features of dynamic, subdivided populations to understand their evolutionary dynamics.

Buscando em bases de dados remotas. Favor aguardar.