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Predicting positive and negative impacts of cancer among long‐term endometrial cancer survivors

Rowlands, Ingrid J. ; Lee, Christina ; Janda, Monika ; Nagle, Christina M. ; Obermair, Andreas ; Webb, Penelope M.

Psycho‐Oncology, September 2013, Vol.22(9), pp.1963-1971 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Predicting positive and negative impacts of cancer among long‐term endometrial cancer survivors
  • Autor: Rowlands, Ingrid J. ; Lee, Christina ; Janda, Monika ; Nagle, Christina M. ; Obermair, Andreas ; Webb, Penelope M.
  • Assuntos: Endometrial Cancer ; Psychosocial Oncology ; Survivors ; Wellbeing ; Coping
  • É parte de: Psycho‐Oncology, September 2013, Vol.22(9), pp.1963-1971
  • Descrição: Byline: Ingrid J. Rowlands, Christina Lee, Monika Janda, Christina M. Nagle, Andreas Obermair, Penelope M. Webb, Abstract Objective Although the survival outcomes among women diagnosed with endometrial cancer are very favorable, little is known about the long-term impact of their cancer experience. This study identifies the extent of positive and negative impacts of cancer and factors associated with this, amongst long-term survivors of endometrial cancer. Methods Australian women diagnosed with endometrial cancer (N=632) were sent questionnaires at the time of diagnosis and 3-5years later. Hierarchical multiple regression models were used to examine whether a range of variables at diagnosis/treatment predicted subsequent scores on the Impact of Cancer Scale, which examines positive (e.g. health awareness) and negative (e.g. appearance concerns) impacts amongst cancer survivors. Results Overall, women had a higher mean score for the positive than negative impact scales (M=3.5 versus M=2.5, respectively). An intermediate grade of endometrial cancer, a prior diagnosis of cancer and lower levels of education were significant, but weak, predictors of higher scores on the positive impact scale. Higher scores on the negative impact scale were predicted by a higher grade of cancer, poor physical and mental health, a younger age, being single or having lower levels of education. Conclusions The study demonstrates that factors that predict positive impact in cancer survivors differ to those that predict negative impact, suggesting that interventions to optimize cancer survivors' quality of life will need to be multi-dimensional, and this supports the need for tailored intervention. Copyright [c] 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Correspondence: Correspondence to: Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Population Health Department, Locked Bag 2000, Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD 4029, Australia. E-mail: Ingrid.Rowlands@qimr.edu.au

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