skip to main content
Primo Search
Search in: Busca Geral

Does ecophysiological behaviour explain habitat occupation of sympatric Clusia species in a Brazilian Atlantic rainforest?

Lüttge, Ulrich ; Scarano, Fabio ; Mattos, Eduardo ; Franco, Augusto ; Broetto, Fernando ; Dias, André ; Duarte, Heitor ; Uehlein, Norbert ; Wendt, Tânia

Trees, 2015, Vol.29(6), pp.1973-1988 [Periódico revisado por pares]

Texto completo disponível

Citações Citado por
  • Título:
    Does ecophysiological behaviour explain habitat occupation of sympatric Clusia species in a Brazilian Atlantic rainforest?
  • Autor: Lüttge, Ulrich ; Scarano, Fabio ; Mattos, Eduardo ; Franco, Augusto ; Broetto, Fernando ; Dias, André ; Duarte, Heitor ; Uehlein, Norbert ; Wendt, Tânia
  • Assuntos: Atlantic rainforest ; Clusia ; Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) ; Diversity ; Habitat occupation ; Photosynthesis ; Phytogeography
  • É parte de: Trees, 2015, Vol.29(6), pp.1973-1988
  • Descrição: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00468-015-1277-1 Byline: Ulrich Luttge (1), Fabio R. Scarano (2,3), Eduardo A. Mattos (3), Augusto C. Franco (4), Fernando Broetto (5), Andre T. C. Dias (6), Heitor M. Duarte (7), Norbert Uehlein (1), Tania Wendt (8) Keywords: Atlantic rainforest; Clusia; Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM); Diversity; Habitat occupation; Photosynthesis; Phytogeography Abstract: Key message Plasticity of ecophysiological acclimation determines habitat occupation of species of Clusia in an Atlantic rainforest of Brazil. Ecophysiological performance is not sufficient for explaining widespread versus locally restricted distribution of species among physiognomic sub-sites within the forest. Abstract Four species of Clusia were studied that have distinct habitat distribution patterns within an Atlantic rainforest research reserve, in Espirito Santo state, southeast Brazil, throughout five sites: a riverine forest, a hill forest, two rock outcrops and an ecotone hill forest/rock outcrop. Clusia aemygdioi Gomes da Silva & B. Weinberg and Clusia intermedia G. Mariz were locally widespread among the sites while Clusia marizii Gomes da Silva & B. Weinberg and Clusia spiritu-sanctensis G. Mariz & B.Weinberg were locally restricted. Clusia spiritu-sanctensis was the only obligate crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, showing low 13.sup.C-discrimination ([delta] 13.sup.C -16.5 to -19.2 [per thousand]) and nocturnal acid accumulation. Data of 13.sup.C discrimination and photosynthetic performance show that C. marizii, C. intermedia and C. aemygdioi performed C.sub.3 photosynthesis. The latter may have some intrinsic capacity for CAM, which needs to be further studied. Because of local abundance Tibouchina heteromalla (D. Don) Cogn. (Melastomaceae) and Kielmeyera occhioniana Saddi (Clusiaceae) were included for comparison with the Clusia species and for typical obligate C.sub.3-photosynthesis behaviour. We asked whether the habitat occupation patterns of the studied species could be explained by ecophysiological performance especially with respect to photosynthesis. The hill forest with a denser tree cover was the most shaded site, and the plants there had shade-plant characteristics, while at all the other sites the plants showed sun-plant features. Clusia intermedia consistently had an inferior performance. Nevertheless, it is equally abundant as C. aemygdioi in one of the sun-exposed, and probably most stressful rock outcrop sites. The obligate C.sub.3-species T. heteromalla performed remarkably well. The CAM in C. spiritu-sanctensis did not appear to be directly related to habitat occupation although it conferred plasticity by flexible expression of CAM phases. Flexibility of acclimation determined habitat occupation of the plants performing C.sub.3 photosynthesis. Ecophysiological performance of the four Clusia species was only slightly related to widespread versus restricted occurrence patterns. Thus, ecophysiological performance alone is not sufficient for explaining the local distribution and abundance of these species, and aspects related to reproductive output deserve future examination. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Biology, Darmstadt University of Technology, Schnittspahnstrasse 3-5, 64287, Darmstadt, Germany (2) Fundacao Brasileira Para o Desenvolvimento Sustentavel, Rua Engenheiro Alvaro Niemeyer, 76, CEP 22610-180, Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil (3) Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), CCS, IB, Caixa Postal 68020, CEP 21941-970, Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil (4) Departamento de Botanica, Universidade de Brasilia, Caixa Postal 04457, CEP 70904-970, Brasilia, DF, Brazil (5) Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade do Estado de Sao Paulo, CEP 18618-000, Botucatu, SP, Brazil (6) Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio der Janeiro, Av. Sao Francisco Xavier 524, PHLC 2[degrees] andar, sala 220, CEP 20550-013, Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil (7) Nucleo em Ecologia e Desenvolvimento Socio-Ambiental de Macae, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NUPEM/UFRJ), Avenida Sao Jose do Barreto, 764, CEP 27965-045, Macae, RJ, Brazil (8) Departamento de Botanica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21941-590, Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Article History: Registration Date: 20/08/2015 Received Date: 20/03/2015 Accepted Date: 19/08/2015 Online Date: 23/09/2015 Article note: Communicated by R. Guy.
  • Idioma: Inglês

Buscando em bases de dados remotas. Favor aguardar.