skip to main content

Civilising Velocity: Masculinity and the Marketing of Britain's Passenger Trains, 1921–39

Divall, Colin

The Journal of Transport History, December 2011, Vol.32(2), pp.164-191 [Periódico revisado por pares]

Texto completo disponível

Citações Citado por
  • Título:
    Civilising Velocity: Masculinity and the Marketing of Britain's Passenger Trains, 1921–39
  • Autor: Divall, Colin
  • Assuntos: Engineering ; History & Archaeology ; Economics
  • É parte de: The Journal of Transport History, December 2011, Vol.32(2), pp.164-191
  • Descrição: Little attention has been given to the gendering between the world wars of rail-based mobility - "railing". In order to meet the competitive threat from motoring, British railway companies marketed railing as a more civilised form of transport. While the train could not match the automobile's freedom of movement, the constraints of track and timetable offered compensations in the form of safety, time savings and comfort. This "civilised velocity" was construed as being provided by a male workforce and valued by both sexes. However, it was not understood as being equally available to women and men. The railway's male managers and workforce considered men to be the primary consumers of civilised velocity, and male norms framed the ways in which women's railing was marketed. (Author abstract)
  • Idioma: Inglês

Buscando em bases de dados remotas. Favor aguardar.