skip to main content

Borderlands as spaces: Creating third spaces and fractured landscapes in medieval Northern Finland

Ylimaunu, Timo ; Lakomäki, Sami ; Kallio-Seppä, Titta ; Mullins, Paul R ; Nurmi, Risto ; Kuorilehto, Markku

Journal of Social Archaeology, June 2014, Vol.14(2), pp.244-267 [Periódico revisado por pares]

Texto completo disponível

Citações Citado por
  • Título:
    Borderlands as spaces: Creating third spaces and fractured landscapes in medieval Northern Finland
  • Autor: Ylimaunu, Timo ; Lakomäki, Sami ; Kallio-Seppä, Titta ; Mullins, Paul R ; Nurmi, Risto ; Kuorilehto, Markku
  • Assuntos: Borderlands ; Third Space ; State Formation ; Medieval Archeology ; Hybridity ; History & Archaeology
  • É parte de: Journal of Social Archaeology, June 2014, Vol.14(2), pp.244-267
  • Descrição: Cultural anthropologists and historians have successfully adopted a borderlands perspective to investigate interaction, power, and identity between emerging or expanding state societies. This article develops an archaeological approach to such interstitial landscapes. It conceptualizes borderlands as spaces where people engage the material world under very specific geopolitical circumstances and create very specific materialities and subjectivities in the process. Political, social, and ideological dynamics between state societies produce two kinds of cultural spaces: hybrid “third spaces” and “fractured landscapes.” Although seemingly contradictory, these often emerge side by side in the same physical space. We illustrate this process by exploring the expansion of the Catholic Church and the Swedish kingdom to the Northern Ostrobothnian coast in northern Finland during the Middle Ages (ca. 1300–1600). During this era, church buildings and cemeteries became sites where locals, ecclesial officials, and state agents negotiated their relations through complex material and spatial practices.
  • Idioma: Inglês

Buscando em bases de dados remotas. Favor aguardar.