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An experimental investigation of the functional hypothesis and evolutionary advantage of stone-tipped spears

Wilkins, Jayne ; Schoville, Benjamin J ; Brown, Kyle S

PloS one, 2014, Vol.9(8), pp.e104514 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    An experimental investigation of the functional hypothesis and evolutionary advantage of stone-tipped spears
  • Autor: Wilkins, Jayne ; Schoville, Benjamin J ; Brown, Kyle S
  • Assuntos: Biological Evolution ; Fossils ; Hominidae -- Psychology ; Technology -- History ; Weapons -- History
  • É parte de: PloS one, 2014, Vol.9(8), pp.e104514
  • Descrição: Stone-tipped weapons were a significant innovation for Middle Pleistocene hominins. Hafted hunting technology represents the development of new cognitive and social learning mechanisms within the genus Homo, and may have provided a foraging advantage over simpler forms of hunting technology, such as a sharpened wooden spear. However, the nature of this foraging advantage has not been confirmed. Experimental studies and ethnographic reports provide conflicting results regarding the relative importance of the functional, economic, and social roles of hafted hunting technology. The controlled experiment reported here was designed to test the functional hypothesis for stone-tipped weapons using spears and ballistics gelatin. It differs from previous investigations of this type because it includes a quantitative analysis of wound track profiles and focuses specifically on hand-delivered spear technology. Our results do not support the hypothesis that tipped spears penetrate deeper than untipped spears. However, tipped spears create a significantly larger inner wound cavity that widens distally. This inner wound cavity is analogous to the permanent wound cavity in ballistics research, which is considered the key variable affecting the relative 'stopping power' or 'killing power' of a penetrating weapon. Tipped spears conferred a functional advantage to Middle Pleistocene hominins, potentially affecting the frequency and regularity of hunting success with important implications for human adaptation and life history.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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