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Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2

Arnold, Nathan P ; Branson, Mark ; Burt, Melissa A ; Abbot, Dorian S ; Kuang, Zhiming ; Randall, David A ; Tziperman, Eli

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 29 July 2014, Vol.111(30), pp.10943-8 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2
  • Autor: Arnold, Nathan P ; Branson, Mark ; Burt, Melissa A ; Abbot, Dorian S ; Kuang, Zhiming ; Randall, David A ; Tziperman, Eli
  • Assuntos: Climate Projections ; Climate Sensitivity ; Global Warming ; Atmosphere ; Carbon Dioxide ; Climate Change ; Models, Theoretical
  • É parte de: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 29 July 2014, Vol.111(30), pp.10943-8
  • Descrição: The effect of clouds on climate remains the largest uncertainty in climate change predictions, due to the inability of global climate models (GCMs) to resolve essential small-scale cloud and convection processes. We compare preindustrial and quadrupled CO2 simulations between a conventional GCM in which convection is parameterized and a "superparameterized" model in which convection is explicitly simulated with a cloud-permitting model in each grid cell. We find that the global responses of the two models to increased CO2 are broadly similar: both simulate ice-free Arctic summers, wintertime Arctic convection, and enhanced Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) activity. Superparameterization produces significant differences at both CO2 levels, including greater Arctic cloud cover, further reduced sea ice area at high CO2, and a stronger increase with CO2 of the MJO.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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