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Mortality risk and survival in the aftermath of the medieval Black Death

Dewitte, Sharon N

PloS one, 2014, Vol.9(5), pp.e96513 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Mortality risk and survival in the aftermath of the medieval Black Death
  • Autor: Dewitte, Sharon N
  • Assuntos: Epidemics -- History ; Plague -- Mortality
  • É parte de: PloS one, 2014, Vol.9(5), pp.e96513
  • Descrição: The medieval Black Death (c. 1347-1351) was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history. It killed tens of millions of Europeans, and recent analyses have shown that the disease targeted elderly adults and individuals who had been previously exposed to physiological stressors. Following the epidemic, there were improvements in standards of living, particularly in dietary quality for all socioeconomic strata. This study investigates whether the combination of the selective mortality of the Black Death and post-epidemic improvements in standards of living had detectable effects on survival and mortality in London. Samples are drawn from several pre- and post-Black Death London cemeteries. The pre-Black Death sample comes from the Guildhall Yard (n = 75) and St. Nicholas Shambles (n = 246) cemeteries, which date to the 11th-12th centuries, and from two phases within the St. Mary Spital cemetery, which date to between 1120-1300 (n = 143). The St. Mary Graces cemetery (n = 133) was...
  • Idioma: Inglês

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