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MONITORING SOCIAL MOBILITY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY; SPECIAL EDITORS: DAVID B. GRUSKY, TIMOTHY M. SMEDING, AND C. MATTHEW SNIPP: SECTION III: ISSUES OF IMPLMENTATION: Potential Data Sources for a New Study of Social Mobility in the United States

JOHN ROBERT WARREN

Annals, Vol.657 pp.208-265, 2015 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    MONITORING SOCIAL MOBILITY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY; SPECIAL EDITORS: DAVID B. GRUSKY, TIMOTHY M. SMEDING, AND C. MATTHEW SNIPP: SECTION III: ISSUES OF IMPLMENTATION: Potential Data Sources for a New Study of Social Mobility in the United States
  • Autor: JOHN ROBERT WARREN
  • Assuntos: Characteristics; Administrative; Traditionally; Institutions; Observations; Advantageous; Supplemented; Conclusions; Summarizing; Limitations; Administrative Law; Constitutional Law; Criminal Law & Procedure; Pensions & Benefits Law
  • É parte de: Annals, Vol.657 pp.208-265, 2015
  • Descrição: ... To the extent that the new data resource contains administrative records or includes private information--about participants' identities, to be sure, but also about sensitive subjects such as income, assets, or health--researchers will have to accept a trade-off between data access and data security. ... The ideal data resource would certainly include measures of sensitive issues (e.g., income, health) and may well include administrative record data. ... These nine include the GSS, HRS, HS&B, Add Health, NLSY-79, NLSY-97, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), Project Talent (PT), and the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). ... Bottom line Supplementing the CPS--using either of the two designs described here--would produce new data on contemporary patterns of social and economic mobility that would include large samples and high-quality measures of the social and economic circumstances of sample members and their family members. ... Finally, as with the nine smaller sample surveys described above, it would not be possible to use CPS-based data to fully consider the roles of demographic factors--fertility, child mortality, international migration, and assortative mating--in transforming and reproducing distributions of social and economic resources across generations. ... Finally, the combination of representative cross-sectional data on people in this cohort in the 2006-2014 ACS; of linked records for members of this birth cohort; and of representative cross-sectional data on their parents' generation in 1990 would allow us to consider the roles of migration, fertility, and mortality--as well as intergenerational mobility--in reshaping distributions of social and economic resources over time. ... Evaluating a New Stand-Alone Survey One could field a new data collection operation that allowed for an updated assessment of rates and patterns of social mobility in the United States. ... New data collection would allow for a wider range of measures of social and economic circumstances than are typically available in extant surveys; the new data could also be linked to administrative record data. ... Whereas the design described above (which involved linking children in the 1990 census to their responses in subsequent ACS surveys) would generate a sample that generalized only to a particular birth cohort, the AOS would include individuals from a wide range of cohorts. ... Supplement or link the ACS The ACS's enormous sample size, its broader population coverage, and its broad range of measures of individuals' social and economic circumstances make it an especially attractive resource for gathering new data on social and economic mobility. ... Consequently, ACS records can technically be linked to any other federal data that have also been PIKed--including other Census Bureau data (e.g., the decennial census), the Current Population Survey, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) data, Veterans Administration data, and Social Security Administration (SSA) records.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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