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Day-Night Variations in Malate Concentration, Osmotic Pressure, and Hydrostatic Pressure in Cereus validus

Lüttge, Ulrich ; Nobel, Park S.

Plant Physiology, 1 July 1984, Vol.75(3), pp.804-807 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Day-Night Variations in Malate Concentration, Osmotic Pressure, and Hydrostatic Pressure in Cereus validus
  • Autor: Lüttge, Ulrich ; Nobel, Park S.
  • Assuntos: Basic Biological Sciences ; Cacti ; Metabolism ; Carbon Dioxide ; Daily Variations ; Esters ; Hydrostatics ; Maleic Acid ; Osmosis ; Plant Stems ; Stomata ; Transpiration ; Carbon Compounds ; Carbon Oxides ; Carboxylic Acids ; Chalcogenides ; Dicarboxylic Acids ; Diffusion ; Openings ; Organic Acids ; Organic Compounds ; Oxides ; Oxygen Compounds ; Plants ; Variations ; 550200 - Biochemistry ; 550500 - Metabolism
  • É parte de: Plant Physiology, 1 July 1984, Vol.75(3), pp.804-807
  • Descrição: Malate concentration and stem osmotic pressure concomitantly increase during nighttime CO 2 fixation and then decrease during the daytime in the obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Cereus validus (Cactaceae). Changes in malate osmotic pressure calculated using the Van't Hoff relation match the changes in stem osmotic pressure, indicating that changes in malate level affected the water relations of the succulent stems. In contrast to stem osmotic pressure, stem water potential showed little day-night changes, suggesting that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure occurred. This was corroborated by direct measurements of hydrostatic pressure using the Jülich pressure probe where a small oil-filled micropipette is inserted directly into chlorenchyma cells, which indicated a 4-fold increase in hydrostatic pressure from dusk to dawn. A transient increase of hydrostatic pressure at the beginning of the dark period was correlated with a short period of stomatal closing between afternoon and nighttime CO 2 fixation, suggesting that the rather complex hydrostatic pressure patterns could be explained by an interplay between the effects of transpiration and malate levels. A second CAM plant, Agave deserti, showed similar day-night changes in hydrostatic pressure in its succulent leaves. It is concluded that, in addition to the inverted stomatal rhythm, the oscillations of malate markedly affect osmotic pressures and hence water relations of CAM plants.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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