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Influence of Applied Nacl on Crassulacean Acid Metabolism and Ionic Levels in a Cactus, Cereus validus

Nobel, Park S. ; Lüttge, Ulrich ; Ball, Erika

Plant Physiology, 1 July 1984, Vol.75(3), pp.799-803 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Influence of Applied Nacl on Crassulacean Acid Metabolism and Ionic Levels in a Cactus, Cereus validus
  • Autor: Nobel, Park S. ; Lüttge, Ulrich ; Ball, Erika
  • Assuntos: Botany
  • É parte de: Plant Physiology, 1 July 1984, Vol.75(3), pp.799-803
  • Descrição: To determine possible physiological responses to salinity, seedlings of Cereus validus Haworth, a cactus from Salinas Grandes, Argentina, were treated with up to 600 millimolar NaCl for up to 16 days when they were about 9 months old and 100 millimeters tall. Salt stress decreased stem biomass, e.g. it was 19.7 grams for controls and 11.4 grams for plants treated with 400 millimolar NaCl for 14 days. Nocturnal CO 2 uptake in these obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was inhibited 67% upon treatment with 400 millimolar NaCl for 14 days (controls, 181 millimoles CO 2 per square meter), while nocturnal accumulation of malate was inhibited 49% (controls, 230 millimoles malate per square meter). The larger accumulation of malate as compared to uptake of atmospheric CO 2 suggests that internal CO 2 recycling occurred during the dark period. Such recycling was lower in the controls (∼20%) than in the NaCl-treated plants (∼50%). The nocturnal increase in malate and titratable acidity depended on the total daily photosynthetically active radiation available; measurements suggest a quantum requirment of 26 photons per malate. As NaCl in the medium was increased to 600 millimolar in daily increments of 50 millimolar, Na and Cl concentrations in the roots increased from about 7 to 100 millimolar, but K concentration in the cell sap remained near 26 millimolar. Concomitantly, concentrations of Na and Cl in the shoots increased from 8 to 17 millimolar and from 1 to 7 millimolar, respectively, while the K concentration increased about 16 to 60 millimolar. In plants maintained for 14 days at 500 millimolar NaCl, the root levels of Na and Cl increased to 260 millimolar, the shoot levels were about 60 millimolar, and the stem bases began to become necrotic. Such Na retention in the roots together with the special possibilities of carbon reutilization given by CAM are apparently survival mechanisms for the temporarily saline conditions experienced in its natural habitat.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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