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Emergence and Spread of Basal Lineages of Yersinia pestis during the Neolithic Decline.(Report)

Rascovan, Nicolas ; Sjogren, Karl-Goran ; Kristiansen, Kristian ; Nielsen, Rasmus ; Willerslev, Eske ; Desnues, Christelle ; Rasmussen, Simon

Cell, Jan 10, 2019, Vol.176(1), p.295 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Emergence and Spread of Basal Lineages of Yersinia pestis during the Neolithic Decline.(Report)
  • Autor: Rascovan, Nicolas ; Sjogren, Karl-Goran ; Kristiansen, Kristian ; Nielsen, Rasmus ; Willerslev, Eske ; Desnues, Christelle ; Rasmussen, Simon
  • Assuntos: Archaeology – Analysis ; Communicable Diseases – Analysis ; Disease Transmission – Analysis ; Phylogeny – Analysis ; Plague – Analysis ; Genomics – Analysis
  • É parte de: Cell, Jan 10, 2019, Vol.176(1), p.295
  • Descrição: Keywords Yersinia pestis; plague; ancient DNA; Neolithic decline; mega settlements; pathogen evolution; emergence and spread of infectious diseases; metagenomics Highlights * Discovery of the most ancient case of plague in humans, 4,900 years ago in Sweden * Basal lineages of Y. pestis emerged and spread during the Neolithic decline * Plague infections in distinct Eurasian populations during Neolithic and Bronze Age * A plague pandemic likely emerged in large settlements and spread over trade routes Summary Between 5,000 and 6,000 years ago, many Neolithic societies declined throughout western Eurasia due to a combination of factors that are still largely debated. Here, we report the discovery and genome reconstruction of Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, in Neolithic farmers in Sweden, pre-dating and basal to all modern and ancient known strains of this pathogen. We investigated the history of this strain by combining phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses of the bacterial genome, detailed archaeological information, and genomic analyses from infected individuals and hundreds of ancient human samples across Eurasia. These analyses revealed that multiple and independent lineages of Y. pestis branched and expanded across Eurasia during the Neolithic decline, spreading most likely through early trade networks rather than massive human migrations. Our results are consistent with the existence of a prehistoric plague pandemic that likely contributed to the decay of Neolithic populations in Europe. Author Affiliation: (1) Aix Marseille Universite, UMR MEPHI, CNRS FRE2013, IRD 198, AP-HM, IHU - Mediterranee Infection, 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France (2) Department of Historical Studies, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden (3) Center for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark (4) Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA (5) Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK (6) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK (7) Department of Bio and Health Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet 208, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark * Corresponding author Article History: Received 9 August 2018; Revised 10 October 2018; Accepted 1 November 2018 (miscellaneous) Published: December 6, 2018 (footnote)8 These authors contributed equally (footnote)9 Present address: Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark (footnote)10 Lead Contact Byline: Nicolas Rascovan [nicorasco@gmail.com] (1,*), Karl-Goran Sjogren (2,8), Kristian Kristiansen (2,8), Rasmus Nielsen (3,4), Eske Willerslev (3,5,6), Christelle Desnues (1), Simon Rasmussen [simon.rasmussen@cpr.ku.dk] (7,9,10,**)
  • Idioma: Inglês

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