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Differential Host Handling Behavior between Feeding and Oviposition in the Parasitic Wasp Haplogonatopus hernandezae.(Report)

Uy, Floria M.K. ; Espinoza, Ana Mercedes

Journal of Insect Behavior, 2018, Vol.31(5), p.569(16) [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Differential Host Handling Behavior between Feeding and Oviposition in the Parasitic Wasp Haplogonatopus hernandezae.(Report)
  • Autor: Uy, Floria M.K. ; Espinoza, Ana Mercedes
  • Assuntos: Wasps ; Animal Behavior ; Resveratrol
  • É parte de: Journal of Insect Behavior, 2018, Vol.31(5), p.569(16)
  • Descrição: Byline: Floria M.K. Uy (1,2), Ana Mercedes Espinoza (3,4) Keywords: Decision-making; Dryinidae; Haplogonatopus hernandezae; host-feeding; host-handling; oviposition; parasitoid; Tagosodes orizicolus Abstract: Lifetime fitness is directly influenced by the decision to use resources for either current or future reproduction. Thus, females should weigh the costs and benefits of each reproductive opportunity and allocate resources accordingly. Here, we explore decision-making and the time spent handling hosts of different instars in the parasitoid Haplogonatopus hernandezae, which uses a single planthopper host to either oviposit (i.e., current reproduction) or feed (i.e., future reproduction). Our results indicate that manipulation time in attacks that led to either oviposition and feeding increased with host instar and size. Consequently, attacks were less successful on older host instars than younger ones. Similarly, attack and handling time during oviposition was greater when manipulating fifth instar nymphs compared to younger ones, but oviposition time was similar. Surprisingly, host grasping by the chelate forelegs differed between oviposition and feeding events, and the specific chelate foreleg morphology of H. hernandezae facilitates the specific grasp of the clypeus and gena of the host. We also link this previously undescribed host grasping and differential handling behavior in this species to the final decision to oviposit or feed. Given the differences in handling time and effort among different host instars, we found that older hosts were more often chosen for consumption than younger hosts, and younger hosts were chosen more often for oviposition. Our study suggests that the tradeoff between current and future benefits is influenced by the investment in handling hosts of different instars, and the assessment of host suitability for successful offspring survival. Author Affiliation: (1) 0000 0004 1937 0706, grid.412889.e, Escuela de Biologia, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro, Costa Rica (2) 0000 0004 1936 8606, grid.26790.3a, Department of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, 33124, USA (3) 0000 0004 1937 0706, grid.412889.e, Centro de Investigaciones en Biologia Celular y Molecular, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro, Costa Rica (4) 0000 0004 1937 0706, grid.412889.e, Escuela de Agronomia, Facultad de Ciencias Agroalimentarias, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro, Costa Rica Article History: Registration Date: 05/10/2018 Received Date: 30/11/2017 Accepted Date: 05/10/2018 Online Date: 10/10/2018 Article note: Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (https://doi.org/10.1007/s10905-018-9699-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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