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The Plastid Genome in Cladophorales Green Algae Is Encoded by Hairpin Chromosomes.(Report)

Del Cortona, Andrea ; Leliaert, Frederik ; Bogaert, Kenny A. ; Turmel, Monique ; Boedeker, Christian ; Janouskovec, Jan ; Lopez-Bautista, Juan M. ; Verbruggen, Heroen ; Vandepoele, Klaas ; De Clerck, Olivier

Current Biology, Dec 18, 2017, Vol.27(24), p.3771 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    The Plastid Genome in Cladophorales Green Algae Is Encoded by Hairpin Chromosomes.(Report)
  • Autor: Del Cortona, Andrea ; Leliaert, Frederik ; Bogaert, Kenny A. ; Turmel, Monique ; Boedeker, Christian ; Janouskovec, Jan ; Lopez-Bautista, Juan M. ; Verbruggen, Heroen ; Vandepoele, Klaas ; De Clerck, Olivier
  • Assuntos: Genetic Research ; Genomes ; Biotechnology ; Genes ; Anopheles ; Genomics
  • É parte de: Current Biology, Dec 18, 2017, Vol.27(24), p.3771
  • Descrição: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.11.004 Byline: Andrea Del Cortona (1,2,3,4,11), Frederik Leliaert (1,5,11), Kenny A. Bogaert (1), Monique Turmel (6), Christian Boedeker (7), Jan Janouskovec (8), Juan M. Lopez-Bautista (9), Heroen Verbruggen (10), Klaas Vandepoele (2,3,4), Olivier De Clerck [olivier.declerck@ugent.be] (1,12,*) Keywords chloroplast genome; hairpin chromosome; genetic code; algae; Ulvophyceae; Cladophorales Highlights * The chloroplast genome of Cladophorales algae is fragmented into hairpin chromosomes * The hairpin chromosomes are short GC-rich ssDNA molecules with one or two genes * Chloroplast genes are highly divergent from their corresponding orthologs * Fragmentation of the chloroplast genome coincided with gene transfer to the nucleus Summary Virtually all plastid (chloroplast) genomes are circular double-stranded DNA molecules, typically between 100 and 200 kb in size and encoding circa 80--250 genes. Exceptions to this universal plastid genome architecture are very few and include the dinoflagellates, where genes are located on DNA minicircles. Here we report on the highly deviant chloroplast genome of Cladophorales green algae, which is entirely fragmented into hairpin chromosomes. Short- and long-read high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA demonstrated that the chloroplast genes of Boodlea composita are encoded on 1- to 7-kb DNA contigs with an exceptionally high GC content, each containing a long inverted repeat with one or two protein-coding genes and conserved non-coding regions putatively involved in replication and/or expression. We propose that these contigs correspond to linear single-stranded DNA molecules that fold onto themselves to form hairpin chromosomes. The Boodlea chloroplast genes are highly divergent from their corresponding orthologs, and display an alternative genetic code. The origin of this highly deviant chloroplast genome most likely occurred before the emergence of the Cladophorales, and coincided with an elevated transfer of chloroplast genes to the nucleus. A chloroplast genome that is composed only of linear DNA molecules is unprecedented among eukaryotes, and highlights unexpected variation in plastid genome architecture. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Biology, Phycology Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent, Belgium (2) Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium (3) VIB Center for Plant Systems Biology, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium (4) Bioinformatics Institute Ghent, Ghent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium (5) Botanic Garden Meise, Nieuwelaan 38, 1860 Meise, Belgium (6) Institut de Biologie Integrative et des Systemes, Departement de Biochimie, de Microbiologie et de Bio-informatique, Universite Laval, Pavillon Charles-Eugene-Marchand 1030, Avenue de la Medecine, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada (7) School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Kirk Building, Kelburn Parade, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012, New Zealand (8) Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK (9) Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, 300 Hackberry Lane, Tuscaloosa, AL 35484-0345, USA (10) School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Professors Walk, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia * Corresponding author Article History: Received 25 September 2017; Revised 30 October 2017; Accepted 1 November 2017 (miscellaneous) Published: November 30, 2017 (footnote)11 These authors contributed equally (footnote)12 Lead Contact
  • Idioma: Inglês

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