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Ascaris from Humans and Pigs Appear to Be Reproductively Isolated Species.(Viewpoints)(Report)

Soe, Martin Jensen ; Kapel, Christian M. O. ; Nejsum, Peter

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Sept 1, 2016, Vol.10(9), p.e0004855 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Ascaris from Humans and Pigs Appear to Be Reproductively Isolated Species.(Viewpoints)(Report)
  • Autor: Soe, Martin Jensen ; Kapel, Christian M. O. ; Nejsum, Peter
  • Assuntos: Ascaris – Health Aspects ; Ascaris – Research ; Ascaris – Genetic Aspects ; DNA Sequencing – Usage
  • É parte de: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Sept 1, 2016, Vol.10(9), p.e0004855
  • Descrição: Nuclear DNA Markers Segregate Worms According to Host and Geographical Origin However, four studies have examined highly variable nuclear markers--that is, microsatellites and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP)--in worm isolates of human and pig origin from many different geographic locations and identified distinct segregation according to host and geographical origin: Assuming a mutation rate equal to that of the related nematode Caenorhabditis elegans [13] (1.6 x 10-7 mutations per site per generation) would lead to an estimate of 325,000 generations since the divergence of these two haplotypes, predating pig domestication events. [...]the presence of shared haplotypes most likely represents retention of ancestral polymorphisms, but we recognize that introgression (or a combination of the two) also may explain these observations.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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