skip to main content

Evidence for genetic and behavioral adaptations in the ontogeny of prehistoric hunter-gatherer limb robusticity

Osipov, Benjamin ; Temple, Daniel ; Cowgill, Libby ; Harrington, Lesley ; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I. ; Weber, Andrzej W.

Quaternary International, June 16, 2016, Vol.405, p.134(13) [Periódico revisado por pares]

Texto completo disponível

Citações Citado por
  • Título:
    Evidence for genetic and behavioral adaptations in the ontogeny of prehistoric hunter-gatherer limb robusticity
  • Autor: Osipov, Benjamin ; Temple, Daniel ; Cowgill, Libby ; Harrington, Lesley ; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I. ; Weber, Andrzej W.
  • Assuntos: Archaeology – Analysis ; Prehistory – Analysis ; Hunting and Gathering Societies – Analysis
  • É parte de: Quaternary International, June 16, 2016, Vol.405, p.134(13)
  • Descrição: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2015.09.093 Byline: Benjamin Osipov, Daniel Temple, Libby Cowgill, Lesley Harrington, Vladimir I. Bazaliiskii, Andrzej W. Weber Abstract: Biomechanical analyses of past populations have primarily focused on adults and interpreted variation in limb bone robusticity as indicative of differences in behavior. However, prior to skeletal maturity large changes occur in limb bone robusticity and shape. During ontogeny, the accrual of bone is regulated by differences in genetics and nutrition as well as mechanical loading. We consider how long bone robusticity changes from birth to young adulthood in order to understand when population differences appear during development and why this occurs. We analyzed the femoral and humeral midshafts of four prehistoric hunter-gatherer skeletal samples from four regions: Cis-Baikal, Siberia, Point Hope, Alaska, the central Japanese coast, and the South African Cape. Some statistically significant differences between populations manifest at birth or soon after. Some of this systemic patterning likely reflects adaptation of body shape to climate. Later Stone Age South Africans also appear to demonstrate low limb rigidity residuals as a result of growth towards a unique body type. Differentiation between populations also increases with age, pointing to functional adaptation as a result of behavioral differences. This proves largely concordant with other lines of evidence for differing levels of terrestrial and aquatic mobility in these populations. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H4, Canada (b) Department of Sociology and Anthropology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 22030-4444, USA (c) Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA (d) Department of Archaeology and Ethnography, Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk 664003, Russia (e) Laboratoire Mediterraneen de Prehistoire Europe Afrique (LAMPEA) - UMR 7269, Aix-Marseille Universite, 5 rue du Chateau de l'Horloge - B.P. 647, 13094 Aix-en-Provence Cedex 2, France
  • Idioma: Inglês

Buscando em bases de dados remotas. Favor aguardar.