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Evidence for an adaptation in ROS scavenging systems in human testicular peritubular cells from infertility patients.(Report)

Kampfer, C. ; Spillner, S. ; Spinnler, K. ; Schwarzer, J. U. ; Terradas, C. ; Ponzio, R. ; Puigdomenech, E. ; Levalle, O. ; Kohn, F. M. ; Matzkin, M. E. ; Calandra, R. S. ; Frungieri, M. B. ; Mayerhofer, A.

International Journal of Andrology, Dec, 2012, Vol.35, p.793(9) [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Evidence for an adaptation in ROS scavenging systems in human testicular peritubular cells from infertility patients.(Report)
  • Autor: Kampfer, C. ; Spillner, S. ; Spinnler, K. ; Schwarzer, J. U. ; Terradas, C. ; Ponzio, R. ; Puigdomenech, E. ; Levalle, O. ; Kohn, F. M. ; Matzkin, M. E. ; Calandra, R. S. ; Frungieri, M. B. ; Mayerhofer, A.
  • Assuntos: Cells (Biology) -- Analysis ; Infertility -- Analysis ; Glutathione Transferase -- Analysis ; Immunohistochemistry -- Analysis ; Prostaglandins -- Analysis
  • É parte de: International Journal of Andrology, Dec, 2012, Vol.35, p.793(9)
  • Descrição: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2605.2012.01281.x/abstract Byline: C. Kampfer(1), S. Spillner(1), K. Spinnler(1), J. U. Schwarzer(2), C. Terradas(3)(4), R. Ponzio(5), E. Puigdomenech(4), O. Levalle(3), F. M. Kohn(6), M. E. Matzkin(7)(8), R. S. Calandra(7), M. B. Frungieri(7)(8), A. Mayerhofer(1) Keywords: COX-2; immune cells; male infertility; oxidative stress; prostaglandins Summary Fibrosis, increased amounts of immune cells and expression of COX-2 in the testes of infertility patients provide circumstantial evidence for a specific testicular milieu, in which reactive oxygen species (ROS) could be increased. If ROS level increase and/or ROS scavengers decrease, the resulting testicular oxidative stress may contribute to human male infertility. Primary peritubular cells of the human testis, from men with normal spermatogenesis (HTPCs) and infertile patients (HTPC-Fs), previously allowed us to identify an end product of COX-2 action, a prostaglandin derivative (15dPGJ2), which acts via ROS to alter the phenotype of peritubular cells, at least in vitro. Using testicular biopsies we now found 15dPGJ2 in patients and hence we started exploring the ROS scavenger systems of the human testis. This system includes catalase, DJ-1, peroxiredoxin 1, SOD 1 and 2, glutathione-S-transferase and HMOX-1, which were identified by RT-PCR/sequencing in HTPCs and HTPC-Fs and whole testes. Catalase, DJ-1, peroxiredoxin 1 and SOD 2 were also detected by Western blots and in part by immunohistochemistry in testicular samples. Western blots of cultured cells further revealed that catalase levels, but not peroxiredoxin 1, SOD 2 or DJ-1 levels, are significantly higher in HTPC-Fs than in HTPCs. This particular difference is correlated with the improved ability of HTPC-Fs to handle ROS, which became evident when cells were exposed to 100 I1/4m H.sub.2O.sub.2. H.sub.2O.sub.2 induced stronger responses in HTPCs than in HTPC-Fs, which correlates with the lower level of the H.sub.2O.sub.2-degrading defence enzyme catalase in HTPCs. The results provide evidence for an adaptation to elevated ROS levels, which must have occurred in vivo and which persist in vitro in HTPC-Fs. Thus, in infertile men with impaired spermatogenesis elevated ROS levels likely exist, at least in the tubular wall. Author Affiliation: (1)Anatomy and Cell Biology, Munich, Germany (2)Praxis for Urology and Andrology, Freising, Germany (3)Division Endocrinologia, Hospital Durand, Buenos Aires, Argentina (4)Instituto Medico PREFER, San Martin, Argentina (5)Centro de Investigaciones en Reproduccion, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina (6)Andrologicum, Munich, Germany (7)Laboratorio de Esteroides, Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina (8)Departamento de Bioquimica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina Correspondence: (*) Artur Mayerhofer, MD, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Biedersteiner Strasse 29, D-80802 Munich, Germany. E-mail: mayerhofer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de Article Note: (*) Grant information: DFG MA 1080/20-1; DAAD; Friedrich-Baur Stiftung Received 29 September 2011; revised 23 February 2012; accepted 25 March 2012 Supporting information: Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article Figure S1. ROS measurements using HTPC-Fs and 15dPGJ2. ROS generation increased over time in HTPCaFs after the addition of 10 I1/4M 15dPGJ2 (stimulation time 4 h) and is inhibited by 1 mM NAC (pre-incubation 1 h, followed by co-stimulation with 15dPGJ2) as monitored by fluorescence microscopy (bar represents 10 I1/4m). Please note: Wiley-Blackwell is not responsible for the content or functionality of any supporting materials supplied by the authors. Any queries (other than missing material) should be directed to the corresponding author for the article.
  • Idioma: English

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