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An important military city of the Early Western Zhou Dynasty: Archaeobotanical evidence from the Chenzhuang site, Gaoqing, Shandong Province.(Report)

Jin, Guiyun ; Zheng, Tongxiu ; Liu, Changjiang ; Wang, Chuanming ; Gao, Mingkui

Chinese Science Bulletin, Jan, 2012, Vol.57(2-3), p.253(8) [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    An important military city of the Early Western Zhou Dynasty: Archaeobotanical evidence from the Chenzhuang site, Gaoqing, Shandong Province.(Report)
  • Autor: Jin, Guiyun ; Zheng, Tongxiu ; Liu, Changjiang ; Wang, Chuanming ; Gao, Mingkui
  • Assuntos: Horses ; Archaeology ; Chinese History
  • É parte de: Chinese Science Bulletin, Jan, 2012, Vol.57(2-3), p.253(8)
  • Descrição: Byline: GuiYun Jin (1), TongXiu Zheng (2), ChangJiang Liu (3), ChuanMing Wang (1), MingKui Gao (2) Keywords: Early Western Zhou Dynasty; military city; Chenzhuang site; archaeobotanic evidence; carbonized sweet clover seeds Abstract: In ancient Chinese history, the Western Zhou Dynasty has long been renowned for having expanded its control and territory into many other states. However, historical documents and archaeological records of this period are limited thus the early history of the Western Zhou Dynasty's operation in eastern China and its establishment of the Qi and Lu states have been unclear. The discovery of the Chenzhuang city site in Gaoqing County, Shandong Province, with chariot-horse pits, an altar and bronze vessels with inscriptions, adds a new line of evidence for studying the history of this period. However, with no direct evidence, the nature of the city site is controversial. Plant remains, especially a large number of sweet clover seeds, recovered from this site by systematic archaeobotanical methods provide an important source of information for research into the site's function. Considering that modern sweet clover is superior fodder for horses and the sweet clover seeds from the Chenzhuang site coexist with chariot-horse pits and horse remains, it is suggested these sweet clover seeds might represent the fodder of battle steeds. This suggestion supports the opinion of those who believe the Chenzhuang city site was once an important military city of the Western Zhou Dynasty in eastern China. Author Affiliation: (1) Center for East Asia Archaeology, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100, China (2) Shandong Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, Jinan, 250012, China (3) Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100093, China Article History: Registration Date: 26/09/2011 Received Date: 11/05/2011 Accepted Date: 05/08/2011 Online Date: 26/09/2011 Article note: This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
  • Idioma: English

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