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Microsatellite analysis of Alpine grape cultivars (Vitis vinifera L.): alleged descendants of Pliny the Elder's Raetica are genetically related.(Author abstract)

Vouillamoz, Jose F. ; Schneider, Anna ; Grando, M. Stella

Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, August, 2007, Vol.54(5), p.1095(10) [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Microsatellite analysis of Alpine grape cultivars (Vitis vinifera L.): alleged descendants of Pliny the Elder's Raetica are genetically related.(Author abstract)
  • Autor: Vouillamoz, Jose F. ; Schneider, Anna ; Grando, M. Stella
  • Assuntos: Cultivars -- Analysis ; Excavations (Archaeology) -- Analysis
  • É parte de: Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, August, 2007, Vol.54(5), p.1095(10)
  • Descrição: Byline: Jose F. Vouillamoz (1,3), Anna Schneider (2), M. Stella Grando (1) Keywords: Grape cultivar; Microsatellite; Parentage; Likelihood ratios; Vitis vinifera Abstract: According to Pliny the Elder and other Greco-Roman geoponics, Raetica was a famous white grape as well as a white wine produced in Raetia, a Province of the Roman Empire. Does Raetica grape have modern descendants? Etymologically and geographically, the white 'Reze' from Valais (Switzerland) would be the best candidate. Using available microsatellite data, we searched for relatives of 'Reze' in our database containing over 1,700 genotypes of grape cultivars from all over the world. Twelve cultivars showing putative first-degree (parent--offspring or full-siblings) or second-degree (grandparent--grandoffspring, uncle--nephew or half-siblings) relationships with 'Reze' were then analysed at 60 microsatellite markers. Calculation of allele sharing and likelihood ratios between competing relationship categories revealed that four cultivars had parent--offspring relationship with 'Reze': 'Cascarolo Bianco' (Piedmont, Italy), 'Arvine Grande' (Valais, Switzerland), 'Groppello di RevA2' and 'Nosiola' (Trentino, Italy). Given that some of these are also said to be Raetica descendants, we may well be on the tracks of Pliny the Elder's Raetica grape. However, there is no evidence about the identity of Raetica. Analysis of ancient DNA of grape pips excavated from archaeological sites of the Roman times might provide key information. Our first attempts were unsuccessful, but analysis of additional samples and optimisation of the method could provide groundbreaking results about the identity of the grapes cultivated in classical antiquity. Author Affiliation: (1) Istituto Agrario, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Via Mach 1, 38010, San Michele all'Adige, TN, Italy (2) CNR, Istituto di Virologia Vegetale, Unita Viticoltura, Torino, Italy (3) National Centre of Competence in Research "Plant Survival", University of Neuchatel, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH-2007, Neuchatel, Switzerland Article History: Registration Date: 22/06/2006 Received Date: 27/01/2006 Accepted Date: 19/06/2006 Online Date: 11/11/2006
  • Idioma: English

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