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Evidence for a Genetic Basis of Aging in Two Wild Vertebrate Populations

Wilson, Alastair J ; Nussey, Daniel H ; Pemberton, Josephine M ; Pilkington, Jill G ; Morris, Alison ; Pelletier, Fanie ; Clutton-Brock, Timothy H ; Kruuk, Loeske E.B

Current Biology, 18 December 2007, Vol.17(24), pp.2136-2142 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Evidence for a Genetic Basis of Aging in Two Wild Vertebrate Populations
  • Autor: Wilson, Alastair J ; Nussey, Daniel H ; Pemberton, Josephine M ; Pilkington, Jill G ; Morris, Alison ; Pelletier, Fanie ; Clutton-Brock, Timothy H ; Kruuk, Loeske E.B
  • Assuntos: Evo_Ecol ; Evo_Ecol ; Biology
  • É parte de: Current Biology, 18 December 2007, Vol.17(24), pp.2136-2142
  • Descrição: Aging, or senescence, defined as a decline in physiological function with age, has long been a focus of research interest for evolutionary biologists. How has natural selection failed to remove genetic effects responsible for such reduced fitness among older individuals? Current evolutionary theory explains this phenomenon by showing that, as a result of the risk of death from environmental causes that individuals experience, the force of selection inevitably weakens with age [1–3]. This in turn means that genetic mutations having detrimental effects that are only felt late in life might persist in a population. Although widely accepted, this theory rests on the assumption that there is genetic variation for aging in natural systems [4, 5], or (equivalently), that genotype-by-age interactions (GxA) occur for fitness. To date, empirical support for this assumption has come almost entirely from laboratory studies on invertebrate systems, most notably Drosophila and C. elegans[6–10],...
  • Idioma: Inglês

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