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Tissue-specific gene regulation corresponds with seasonal plasticity in female testosterone

Bentz, Alexandra B. ; Dossey, Emma K. ; Rosvall, Kimberly A.

General and Comparative Endocrinology, 01/2019, Vol.270, C, pp.26-34 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Tissue-specific gene regulation corresponds with seasonal plasticity in female testosterone
  • Autor: Bentz, Alexandra B. ; Dossey, Emma K. ; Rosvall, Kimberly A.
  • Assuntos: Testosterone – Physiological Aspects ; Messenger RNA – Physiological Aspects ; Liver – Physiological Aspects ; Cytochrome P-450 – Physiological Aspects ; Animal Behavior – Physiological Aspects ; Genetic Research – Physiological Aspects ; Genetic Regulation – Physiological Aspects ; Genes – Physiological Aspects ; Anopheles – Physiological Aspects ; Gene Expression – Physiological Aspects ; Luteinizing Hormone – Physiological Aspects ; Hormones – Physiological Aspects ; Proteins – Physiological Aspects
  • É parte de: General and Comparative Endocrinology, 01/2019, Vol.270, C, pp.26-34
  • Descrição: Byline: Alexandra B. Bentz [bentza@iu.edu] (a,b,*), Emma K. Dossey (a), Kimberly A. Rosvall (a,b) Keywords 5-alpha reductase; Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein; CYP17; 3[beta]HSD; Luteinizing hormone receptor; CYP2C19 Highlights * Seasonal plasticity in peripheral gene regulation was measured in female birds. * Ovarian steroidogenic enzyme expression was higher during territory establishment. * Gonadal sensitivity to luteinizing hormone did not change seasonally. * Hepatic enzyme, CYP2C19, seasonally declined alongside testosterone (T) levels. * Ovarian steroidogenic genes may be key regulators of seasonal plasticity in T. Abstract Testosterone (T) is a sex steroid hormone that often varies seasonally and mediates trade-offs between territorial aggression and parental care. Prior work has provided key insights into the 'top-down' hypothalamic control of this seasonal plasticity in T, yet mechanisms acting outside of the brain may also influence circulating T levels. We hypothesized that peripheral mechanisms may be especially critical for females, because peripheral regulation may mitigate the costs of systemically elevated T. Here, we begin to test this hypothesis using a seasonal comparative approach, measuring gene expression in peripheral tissues in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), a songbird with intense female-female competition and T-mediated aggression. We focused on the gonad and liver for their role in T production and metabolism, respectively, and we contrasted females captured during territory establishment versus incubation. During territory establishment, when T levels are highest, we found elevated gene expression of the hepatic steroid metabolizing enzyme CYP2C19 along with several ovarian steroidogenic enzymes, including the androgenic 5[alpha]-reductase. Despite these seasonal changes in gene expression along the steroidogenic pathway, we did not observe seasonal changes in sensitivity to upstream signals, measured as ovarian mRNA abundance of luteinizing hormone receptor. Together, these data suggest that differential regulation of steroidogenic gene expression in the ovary is a potentially major contributor to seasonal changes in T levels in females. Furthermore, these data provide a unique and organismal glimpse into tissue-specific gene regulation and its potential role in hormonal plasticity in females. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA (b) Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA * Corresponding author at: Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. Article History: Received 24 May 2018; Revised 25 September 2018; Accepted 1 October 2018
  • Idioma: Inglês

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