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First records and potential palaeoecological significance of Dianella (Xanthorrhoeaceae), an extinct representative of the native flora of Rapa Nui (Easter Island).(Report)(Author abstract)

Canellas - Bolta, Nuria ; Rull, Valenti ; Saez, Alberto ; Prebble, Matthew ; Margalef, Olga

Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, May, 2014, Vol.23(3), p.331(8) [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    First records and potential palaeoecological significance of Dianella (Xanthorrhoeaceae), an extinct representative of the native flora of Rapa Nui (Easter Island).(Report)(Author abstract)
  • Autor: Canellas - Bolta, Nuria ; Rull, Valenti ; Saez, Alberto ; Prebble, Matthew ; Margalef, Olga
  • Assuntos: Grasslands -- Analysis ; Archaeology -- Analysis ; Paleontology -- Analysis ; Plants (Organisms) -- Analysis
  • É parte de: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, May, 2014, Vol.23(3), p.331(8)
  • Descrição: Byline: Nuria Canellas-Bolta (1,2), Valenti Rull (2), Alberto Saez (1), Matthew Prebble (3), Olga Margalef (4) Keywords: Dianella; Easter Island; Native plant; Holocene; Palaeoecology; Local extinction Abstract: Easter Island, a remote island in the Pacific Ocean, is currently primarily covered by grasslands, but palaeoecological studies have shown the former presence of different vegetation. Much of its original biota has been removed during the last two millennia, most likely by human activities, and little is known about the native flora. Macrofossil and pollen analyses of a sediment core from the Raraku crater lake have revealed the occurrence of a plant that is currently extinct from the island: Dianella cf. intermedia/adenanthera (Xanthorrhoeaceae), which grew and disappeared at the Raraku site long before human arrival. The occurrence of Dianella within the Raraku sedimentary sequence (between 9.4 and 5.4 cal. kyr b.p.) could have been linked to the existence of favorable palaeoenvironmental conditions (peatland rather than the present-day lacustrine environment) during the early to mid Holocene. This finding contributes new knowledge about indigenous plant diversity on Easter Island and reinforces the usefulness of further macrofossil and pollen analyses to identify native species on Easter Island and elsewhere. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Stratigraphy, Paleontology & Marine Geosciences, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti Franques s/n, 08028, Barcelona, Spain (2) Palynology & Paleoecology Lab, Botanic Institute of Barcelona (IBB-CSIC-ICUB), Passeig del Migdia s/n, 08038, Barcelona, Spain (3) Archaeology and Natural History, School of Culture History and Languages, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia (4) Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera (ICTJA-CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028, Barcelona, Spain Article History: Registration Date: 09/01/2014 Received Date: 21/06/2013 Accepted Date: 09/01/2014 Online Date: 04/03/2014 Article note: Communicated by A. E. Bjune. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s00334-014-0432-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
  • Idioma: English

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