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Eggs of intestinal parasites whipworm (Trichuris) and mawworm (Ascaris): Non-pollen palynomorphs in archaeological samples

Brinkkemper, Otto ; van Haaster, Henk

Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 15 October 2012, Vol.186, pp.16-21 [Periódico revisado por pares]

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  • Título:
    Eggs of intestinal parasites whipworm (Trichuris) and mawworm (Ascaris): Non-pollen palynomorphs in archaeological samples
  • Autor: Brinkkemper, Otto ; van Haaster, Henk
  • Assuntos: Ascaris ; Trichuris ; Archeology ; Cesspits ; Hygiene ; Social Status ; Geology
  • É parte de: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 15 October 2012, Vol.186, pp.16-21
  • Descrição: Eggs of some intestinal parasites survive acetolysis and can therefore be found in pollen slides. Especially pollen samples from medieval cesspits can yield large amounts of eggs of whipworm ( ) and mawworm ( ). Eggs of mawworm (also named giant roundworm) have never been assigned a type number in the large range of types published by Van Geel and co-authors, in contrast to those of whipworm (Type 531). This contribution to the special issue for Bas van Geel tries to shed light on these neglected remains, discussing both their identification and their interpretation. ► Eggs of and occur in pollen samples with human faecal remains. ► Identification of these eggs is possible, descriptions and illustrations are given. ► In medieval times, was more common, in post-medieval times . ► Herbal remedies against parasites are very diverse and not very effective. ► No effect of age of the sample or social status of the infected persons.
  • Idioma: Inglês

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